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The FCC Explicitly Warns Not To Compare Cell Phones With SAR Levels

FCC-do-not-compare-single-sar-levels-for-cell-phones

Introduction

Cell phones have become an integral part of our daily lives, but they have also raised concerns about their potential impact on human health. In particular, the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) has been a topic of discussion and debate. SAR is a measure of how much radio frequency (RF) energy is absorbed by the body when using a cell phone. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States tests and regulates the SAR levels of cell phones to ensure that they do not exceed the maximum permissible exposure levels. However, the FCC has explicitly warned against using SAR levels to compare cell phones, as it is not an appropriate way to measure their safety.

SAR was never meant to be used to compare phones

Rashmi Doshi, Chief of the FCC’s cell phone lab, has stated that SAR was never intended to be used by consumers to compare cell phones. The only reason for testing SAR levels is to make sure that cell phones do not exceed certain limits. The results of SAR testing are more of a pass/fail measurement, and every cell phone sold in the U.S. has passed and is considered safe by the FCC.

Consumers are skeptical

Despite the FCC’s warnings, many consumers are still skeptical about the safety of cell phones, especially in light of recent studies that have warned of cancer concerns. Some consumers take precautions to minimize their cell phone exposure by using SAR level apps and switching to speaker phone when they receive alerts that they are likely absorbing more radiation.

Outdated SAR Standards?

While no one is accusing U.S. regulators or the cell phone industry of lying to the public about the safety of cell phones, there are concerns that the current SAR standards may not be the best means of determining their safety. The studies on which these standards are based were conducted in the 1980s, and the standard itself has not been updated since 1996. Additionally, the amount of radiation a phone emits and that is absorbed by a person is highly variable and dependent on many factors, such as the strength of the cell phone signal and how close the device is to the body.

Biological effects at lower levels of SAR

Henry Lai, a researcher and professor at the University of Washington, has conducted studies on the biological effects of cell phone radiation. Lai argues that the SAR rating itself is not meaningful, and what is important is at what level biological effects begin to occur. Lai and his co-author have found that several published studies suggest that biological effects occur at much lower levels of SAR than what the FCC and FDA consider safe.

The FCC and FDA’s stance

The FDA, which determines the safe levels of SAR for consumers, argues that the current SAR standards are an adequate way to determine cell phone safety. The FCC, which is not a medical expert, relies on the expertise of the FDA and other government agencies to determine health criteria, and its job is to test to ensure that devices meet those standards. The FCC is always open to examining changes in the science to ensure that the limits they have set are useful.

Local Governments and the Wireless Industry

Some local governments believe that consumers should be better informed about the SAR levels of the phones they buy and have attempted to pass laws to make the SAR levels public and provide information about reducing exposure to cell phone radiation. However, the wireless industry’s lobbying group, CTIA-The Wireless Association, has promptly filed lawsuits claiming that these laws are unconstitutional and infringe on the First Amendment rights of retailers.

Conclusion

In conclusion, cell phone radiation and its potential effects on human health is a complex and controversial topic that is still being studied by scientists and health organizations. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is a measure used by the FCC to determine the amount of radio-frequency energy absorbed by the body when using a cell phone. However, the SAR value should not be used by consumers to compare the safety of different devices, as it is not a measure of radiation exposure under normal use conditions. The current SAR standards, which were established in 1996, may be outdated and based on limited research, and some studies suggest that biological changes can occur at lower levels of radiation than what the FCC and FDA consider safe.

It’s important to note that while some experts have expressed concern about the potential health effects of cell phone radiation, others believe that the current SAR standards are an adequate way to determine cell phone safety. The FDA takes a weight-of-scientific-evidence approach in evaluating the safety of radio-frequency exposure and takes into account recent studies. However, it’s still unknown what the long-term effects of cell phone radiation exposure may be, especially for children who absorb more radiation than adults.

While more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of cell phone radiation, consumers can take steps to minimize their exposure, such as using a speaker phone, using a headset, or holding the phone away from the body. It’s also recommended to look for a phone with a low SAR value and to be informed about the SAR levels of the devices they purchase.

FAQs

  1. What is SAR in cell phones? The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is a measure used by the FCC to determine the amount of radio-frequency energy absorbed by the body when using a cell phone.
  2. Can SAR be used to compare the safety of different cell phones? No, the SAR value should not be used by consumers to compare the safety of different devices, as it is not a measure of radiation exposure under normal use conditions.
  3. Are current SAR standards outdated? Some experts believe that the current SAR standards, which were established in 1996, may be outdated and based on limited research.
  4. Is cell phone radiation safe for human health? The potential health effects of cell phone radiation are still being studied and are a complex and controversial topic. Some experts have expressed concern about the potential health effects, while others believe that the current SAR standards are an adequate way to determine cell phone safety.

 

 

“The Hidden Dangers of Cell Phone Radiation: What You Need to Know”

“Are You Putting Your Health at Risk with Your Cell Phone?”

“Cell Phone Radiation: Separating Fact from Fiction”

“The Shocking Truth About Cell Phone SAR Levels”

“Protecting Yourself from Cell Phone Radiation: Expert Tips and Advice”

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